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Documenting the Church of the Holy Spirit Clock

We recently oversaw the high resolution photogrammetry survey of the clock at the Church of the Holy Spirit, utilising a scaffolding system in front hundreds of tourists, and falls within our overall Ackerman project. More on this clock can be found on the Ackermann project blog and we will provide more on the result soon.

RTI Dome testing

Last week we tested our new light dome at the Estonian Academy of Arts and the Estonian War Museum. The Dome allows you to significantly speed-up the RTI shooting process. The results are beautiful as always.

Completion of the Recording the Early Medieval Crosses on the Isle of Man

During the summer Archaeovision completed one of our largest recording projects to date, on behalf of the University of Lancaster’s Digital Humanities Hub and Manx National Heritage recording all Early Medieval Crosses found on the Isle of Man. An outline of the project can be found through our blog post here,and an update on the…

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Laser Scanning the ice house at Newtown Park Estate

In February 2019, Archaeovision member Gianna Gandossi conducted a laser scan survey of the Victorian-era brick ice house located on the grounds of Newtown Park Estate, two miles east of Lymington in the New Forest, Hampshire. The recording completed by Archaeovision falls under the Heritage Lottery funded Our Past, Our Future project which incorporates community…

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An Update on Recording the Early Medieval Crosses on the Isle of Man

Over three weeks this July and August, Archaeovision completed one of our largest recording projects to date, on behalf of the University of Lancaster’s Digital Humanities Hub and Manx National Heritage. The project, to laser scan all Early Medieval stone crosses found on the Isle of Man, used blue-light laser light scanning technology employing a…

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Kildalton Chapel Reconstruction

In February of this year, Archaeovision were hired by Islay Heritage, under the guidance of Professor Steven Mithen, the Deputy Vice Chancellor of Reading University, to create an interactive virtual reconstruction of Kildalton Chapel based on its original form. The work incorporated laser scanning, geophysics, aerial drone photography, photogrammetry, 3D modelling and webGL conversion. Kildalton Chapel is…

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Lyndhurst Church RTI

Continuing our RTI project with the New Forest Park Authority, where we have completed a number of captures at Emery Down, Burley and Minstead, and Copythorne, Archaeovision spent a day at St Michael & All Angels church in Lyndhurst capturing a number of gravestones, including Listed tomb (List entry 1094726). The current church building, which is the third on the site,…

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The Recording at Castell Henllys

During the summer of 2016, Archaeovision took part in the detailed recording of two of the reconstructed roundhouses at Castell Henllys in Pembrokeshire, Wales. The work was completed on behalf of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority and focused on the Cook’s House and Earthwatch Roundhouse. Castell Henllys contains replica Iron Age roundhouses that were…

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Copythorne RTI

Continuing with the results of our RTI project with the New Forest Park Authority, where we have completed a number of captures at Emery Down, Burley and Minstead, Archaeovision spent a day at St Mary’s Church in Copythorne capturing a number of gravestones. The church site dates its origin to 1834, with the first church being constructed due to the…

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Source (https://www.pandaw.com/images/fullwidth/product/mandalay-pagan-packet.jpg)

Myanmar (Burma) imaging

Over the next few weeks, in collaboration with SOAS University of London, the École française d’Extrême-Orient and The University of Sydney, Archaeovision will be conducting a number of different recording processes in Myanmar (Burma), including RTI, photogrammetry, high-resolution photography and multi-spectral imaging. The aim of this visit is to improve and increase the number of detailed…

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